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webhopper
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Registered: ‎09-16-2011
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin

Before applying for a new job, I took the liberty of removing all unflattering photos from my facebook page. Including ones from hanging out at restaurants and bars with my friends.


I'm not sure that they checked, but I wasn't going to risk making a bad impression.  


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mcf
Posts: 355
Registered: ‎02-25-2013
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin


webhopper wrote:

Before applying for a new job, I took the liberty of removing all unflattering photos from my facebook page. Including ones from hanging out at restaurants and bars with my friends.


I'm not sure that they checked, but I wasn't going to risk making a bad impression.  


Smart Move! Its crazy we live in a world like that tho, right??

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TimeToRecover
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin

Well I see this as a double edged sword. 

 

You sign up on linkedin knowing your info is public (unless you set it to private) 

 

So them checking on linkedin to see if you are employed where you claim you are vs calling for an employement verification is basically the same.  actually looking on linked in is "less" invasive

 

Also being a programmer the data from social networking sites and the ability to parse an use this data is becoming big business.  How do you think so many sites etc now are able to target the ads the show it.  They are basing it on either web sites you visit or links you click or key words in profile etc.  So yes Amex may have checked your linked it but others probrably use the data on your social networks sites for may other things.


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kimmiller112
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin

If you put your information out there to be seen by the public, then why can't companies look at that information to come to a decision.  If you are applying for a job and your Facebook posts indicate that you are late to work a lot, then the employer should be able to base the decision not to hire you on that information.  If you post that you have just bought a $10,000 piece of jewelry with a credit card but have no idea how you are going to pay it off, then why can't a credit card company decide you are too big of a risk to increase your credit limit.  Same goes if your Linkedin account information doesn't match the information you provide to them.  Don't put your personal information out there if you don't want the possibility of it being used against you in the future.

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chan85
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Registered: ‎03-13-2011
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin


guiness56 wrote:

CreditHammer wrote:

I looked it up and the law isn't crystal clear on the matter but this what I found and hopefully will shed some light!

 

Apparently they can look at your social networking sites if they are marked public and use what they see to make a decision on your application. However, most companies have steered away from this as the creditor must be able to provide evidence that the "visit" was for business use only.. So, if a customer service rep gets Suzie Smith on the phone calling into make a phone payment and the rep thinks she sounds cute and goes to her facebook page to check out what she looks like, then the rep can be fired and the company can be sued for harassment.. BUT, if the she calls in for a CLI and the analyst goes to her page then that looks like a more legitimate reason for the company to be on her page since she is calling in for more credit.. So, if the person wanted to they could fight it.. but the company better have pretty good reason to be on her social networking page..

 

That’s the information that I came away with.. hope this helps!


And what exactly could they use to make a decision, one way or the other?


Social media has two uses for me.

 

My LinkedIn is the professional appearance. It's set on open so anyone can view it, and the purpose of that who profile is for professional and career use. My full name is used so people can locate me as well.

 

Now my Facebook and Twitter pages are set on nicknames, and I have set facebook that you can't even search and find me. I rarely use the twitter, I only signed up to get a coupon on a hotel for my Amex! Now my pinterest account is something else. I stupidly used my real name, and when you google my name it pops up some of the stuff my friends have tagged me in... which can be questionable lol but it's nothing too obscene. Honestly if a company has a problem with my outside activities to that degree, I probably don't want to work for them or do business with them anyway.

I can't see a legit reason my twitter and facebook can be used to make a decision on my credit, that to me seems really invasive and assumptive. However, if you are just verifying my employment information, LinkedIn seems ok. But I can see how they can twist information they find there into reasons for denials. But, if a credit company really wants to deny you, they will give you 1 of the 100 vague and non descript reasons they put on the denial letters, even if its because or something they see on one of your online profiles. Anyone who wants to discriminate will always find a way to cover their butt. Plain and simple unfortunately. Who's to say all these years they haven't been looking at stuff and using it??

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CreditHammer
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Registered: ‎05-14-2013
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin

[ Edited ]

guiness56 wrote:

CreditHammer wrote:

I looked it up and the law isn't crystal clear on the matter but this what I found and hopefully will shed some light!

 

Apparently they can look at your social networking sites if they are marked public and use what they see to make a decision on your application. However, most companies have steered away from this as the creditor must be able to provide evidence that the "visit" was for business use only.. So, if a customer service rep gets Suzie Smith on the phone calling into make a phone payment and the rep thinks she sounds cute and goes to her facebook page to check out what she looks like, then the rep can be fired and the company can be sued for harassment.. BUT, if the she calls in for a CLI and the analyst goes to her page then that looks like a more legitimate reason for the company to be on her page since she is calling in for more credit.. So, if the person wanted to they could fight it.. but the company better have pretty good reason to be on her social networking page..

 

That’s the information that I came away with.. hope this helps!


And what exactly could they use to make a decision, one way or the other?


 

I’m assuming they can use you're employment status. The credit card company is by no means obligated to give you credit... They can find a wide variety of reasons to turn you down if they want to.. Of course, they have to make it legal and legitimate.. They couldn't decline you due to the color of your hair could they? Absolutely not.. So I assume they are looking for things like "does his/her employment status match with his application?" "has he/she worked for them as long as he says he has?" Those kinds of things I guess.. I think it’s ridiculous that they actually may go that far as to look into your LinkedIn. but hey.. looks like they can as long as it’s for Business use.. welcome to 2013 and the wonderful world of social networking :smileyhappy:

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longtimelurker
Posts: 7,325
Registered: ‎04-22-2013
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin


CreditHammer wrote:


 

They couldn't decline you due to the color of your hair could they?


Actually, I don't think that there would be a problem denying it on the color of your hair.  Compare this with credit-info based insurance rates.  "Our internal studies have shown that those with light brown hair are 20% more likely to default in the first three years than...."  Just have to avoid bias against protected categories, so color of skin would be a no-no, and proxies, such as "hair texture" would probably also not be allowed.

 

Re social media.  At my daughters school, many kids removed their FB entries during college application.   You want to be able to control the flow of information, and you have no way of knowing what might please/annoy someone on the admissions committee, and with ever changing privacy permissions, you need to make sure that a "friend" wouldn't post "Hope you get into univ X, it's a real party school so you will fit right in!"   Adding to the paranoia, some parents work at places where job applicants are asked to sign in to social media sites, so the interviewer can see the site without filtering.  Yes, you could claim that you didn't have one, but that might count against you if they found out you did.

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samset93
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎03-19-2013
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin


longtimelurker wrote:

CreditHammer wrote:


 

They couldn't decline you due to the color of your hair could they?


Actually, I don't think that there would be a problem denying it on the color of your hair.  Compare this with credit-info based insurance rates.  "Our internal studies have shown that those with light brown hair are 20% more likely to default in the first three years than...."  Just have to avoid bias against protected categories, so color of skin would be a no-no, and proxies, such as "hair texture" would probably also not be allowed.

 

Re social media.  At my daughters school, many kids removed their FB entries during college application.   You want to be able to control the flow of information, and you have no way of knowing what might please/annoy someone on the admissions committee, and with ever changing privacy permissions, you need to make sure that a "friend" wouldn't post "Hope you get into univ X, it's a real party school so you will fit right in!"   Adding to the paranoia, some parents work at places where job applicants are asked to sign in to social media sites, so the interviewer can see the site without filtering.  Yes, you could claim that you didn't have one, but that might count against you if they found out you did.




If you live in Michigan this is illegal. See http://mashable.com/2012/12/29/michigan-social-media/

and they really have no business snooping in to my facebook/twitter profile (that's why I set them as private). 

 





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longtimelurker
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin


samset93 wrote:

longtimelurker wrote:

CreditHammer wrote:


 

They couldn't decline you due to the color of your hair could they?


Actually, I don't think that there would be a problem denying it on the color of your hair.  Compare this with credit-info based insurance rates.  "Our internal studies have shown that those with light brown hair are 20% more likely to default in the first three years than...."  Just have to avoid bias against protected categories, so color of skin would be a no-no, and proxies, such as "hair texture" would probably also not be allowed.

 

Re social media.  At my daughters school, many kids removed their FB entries during college application.   You want to be able to control the flow of information, and you have no way of knowing what might please/annoy someone on the admissions committee, and with ever changing privacy permissions, you need to make sure that a "friend" wouldn't post "Hope you get into univ X, it's a real party school so you will fit right in!"   Adding to the paranoia, some parents work at places where job applicants are asked to sign in to social media sites, so the interviewer can see the site without filtering.  Yes, you could claim that you didn't have one, but that might count against you if they found out you did.




If you live in Michigan this is illegal. See http://mashable.com/2012/12/29/michigan-social-media/

and they really have no business snooping in to my facebook/twitter profile (that's why I set them as private). 

 


Good for Michigan, hopefully other states will follow.

 

I do see it as a possible test of good judgement.  If you have "stupid" things on your profile, and you know that employers might look, if you haven't protected them, maybe you aren't a great evaluator of risk!

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CreditHammer
Posts: 120
Registered: ‎05-14-2013
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Re: Amex spying on my Linkedin


longtimelurker wrote:

samset93 wrote:

longtimelurker wrote:

CreditHammer wrote:


 

They couldn't decline you due to the color of your hair could they?


Actually, I don't think that there would be a problem denying it on the color of your hair.  Compare this with credit-info based insurance rates.  "Our internal studies have shown that those with light brown hair are 20% more likely to default in the first three years than...."  Just have to avoid bias against protected categories, so color of skin would be a no-no, and proxies, such as "hair texture" would probably also not be allowed.

 

Re social media.  At my daughters school, many kids removed their FB entries during college application.   You want to be able to control the flow of information, and you have no way of knowing what might please/annoy someone on the admissions committee, and with ever changing privacy permissions, you need to make sure that a "friend" wouldn't post "Hope you get into univ X, it's a real party school so you will fit right in!"   Adding to the paranoia, some parents work at places where job applicants are asked to sign in to social media sites, so the interviewer can see the site without filtering.  Yes, you could claim that you didn't have one, but that might count against you if they found out you did.




If you live in Michigan this is illegal. See http://mashable.com/2012/12/29/michigan-social-media/

and they really have no business snooping in to my facebook/twitter profile (that's why I set them as private). 

 


Good for Michigan, hopefully other states will follow.

 

I do see it as a possible test of good judgement.  If you have "stupid" things on your profile, and you know that employers might look, if you haven't protected them, maybe you aren't a great evaluator of risk!


I believe all states should follow this as well.. By enabling one person to go onto your networking page and determine if you should be granted credit in regard to what they see is appauling to me..


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