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Contributor
Posts: 101
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Applying for New Credit Cards

Most of the credit cards I have obtained in the last 5 years have been branded credit cards. I got a Chase Orvis because I was ordering from Orvis and followed the click here to save $xxx on this order. I got a US Bank REI Visa ... same reason. I got a Cabellas Visa ... similiar reason.  The list goes on.

 

I applied for a 2nd Barclay's US Airways card and got denied having adequate credit from Barclays.  The application was totally insolicted on the part of Barclays. 

 

My AAoA is 7 years 1 month per EQ. 

 

Two questions:

 

-  Are all new credit card applications reviewed equally?  If I want a card from XYZ, are you more or less likey to be approved if you apply in response to a promotion received in the mail, a promotion or special offer received because you already have an account with them, an application because you happen to be ordering something on a website, ie get a REI Card and save $xxx now?  Does an impluse application get more favorable review that an unsolicited application?

 

-  When applying for a credit card is there a way to say "This application is for your xxxx Platinium or Signature card with a credit line of at least $12,000".  I have no interest in a different card or a lower limit.  Please do not open a new account for a lesser card or lower limit.  I would rather take the hit for a hard inquiry than get stuck with a low limit.

 

- In todays credit market, any thoughts on total credit limit to total household income ratio?  What ratio are CCC looking at when the denial is "you have adequate total available credit"?     Most of my old (opened 10 plus years ago) have $30K plus limits.  Most of my newer cards have $4K to $6K limits. It might be age, but I suspect it might also be I have adequate total credit.  I know now don't close old accounts, but reducing their limit might be a consideration if their orbtial limits are preventing me from getting better limits on newer cards.

 

Thanks for your thoughts.

Valued Member
Posts: 40
Registered: ‎02-19-2009
0

Re: Applying for New Credit Cards


JJF wrote:

Most of the credit cards I have obtained in the last 5 years have been branded credit cards. I got a Chase Orvis because I was ordering from Orvis and followed the click here to save $xxx on this order. I got a US Bank REI Visa ... same reason. I got a Cabellas Visa ... similiar reason.  The list goes on.

 

I applied for a 2nd Barclay's US Airways card and got denied having adequate credit from Barclays.  The application was totally insolicted on the part of Barclays. 

 

My AAoA is 7 years 1 month per EQ. 

 

Two questions:

 

-  Are all new credit card applications reviewed equally?  If I want a card from XYZ, are you more or less likey to be approved if you apply in response to a promotion received in the mail, a promotion or special offer received because you already have an account with them, an application because you happen to be ordering something on a website, ie get a REI Card and save $xxx now?  Does an impluse application get more favorable review that an unsolicited application?

 

-  When applying for a credit card is there a way to say "This application is for your xxxx Platinium or Signature card with a credit line of at least $12,000".  I have no interest in a different card or a lower limit.  Please do not open a new account for a lesser card or lower limit.  I would rather take the hit for a hard inquiry than get stuck with a low limit.

 

- In todays credit market, any thoughts on total credit limit to total household income ratio?  What ratio are CCC looking at when the denial is "you have adequate total available credit"?     Most of my old (opened 10 plus years ago) have $30K plus limits.  Most of my newer cards have $4K to $6K limits. It might be age, but I suspect it might also be I have adequate total credit.  I know now don't close old accounts, but reducing their limit might be a consideration if their orbtial limits are preventing me from getting better limits on newer cards.

 

Thanks for your thoughts.


2. If you apply for Alliant Credit Union it tells you if you're approved and what credit limit before you accept the card

 

5/1/2009: EQ: 709 TU: 747
3/25/2009: EQ: 621 TU: 646
2/19/2009: EQ: 566 TU: 630
Established Contributor
Posts: 645
Registered: ‎10-24-2007
0

Re: Applying for New Credit Cards


JJF wrote:

Most of the credit cards I have obtained in the last 5 years have been branded credit cards. I got a Chase Orvis because I was ordering from Orvis and followed the click here to save $xxx on this order. I got a US Bank REI Visa ... same reason. I got a Cabellas Visa ... similiar reason.  The list goes on.

 

I applied for a 2nd Barclay's US Airways card and got denied having adequate credit from Barclays.  The application was totally insolicted on the part of Barclays. 

 

 

 

- In todays credit market, any thoughts on total credit limit to total household income ratio?  What ratio are CCC looking at when the denial is "you have adequate total available credit"?     Most of my old (opened 10 plus years ago) have $30K plus limits.  Most of my newer cards have $4K to $6K limits. It might be age, but I suspect it might also be I have adequate total credit.  I know now don't close old accounts, but reducing their limit might be a consideration if their orbtial limits are preventing me from getting better limits on newer cards.

 

Thanks for your thoughts.


I'm not sure that this really answers any of your questions, but it seems that Juniper/Barclays just doesn't like you to have more than one of their cards. I've had 1 Juniper card  for 4 yrs and applied for their Airways card to get $50 off my last flight. I was also denied for having adequate credit limit with them at the time.

Senior Contributor
Posts: 4,831
Registered: ‎04-20-2007
0

Re: Applying for New Credit Cards

Juniper has been ahead of the curve as far as wierd goes. Careful to hold on to your relatively high AAofA. It is hard to get back.
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 261
Registered: ‎01-20-2009
0

Re: Applying for New Credit Cards

The lower credit limits you are receiving may be more of a sign of the times than anything else. You can have greater success in receiving limits you want by investigating the issuer you are going to apply with prior to applying. Alliant was mentioned as far as an issuer that offers you a card with a stated credit limit you can accept or decline. I can't think of another one. Lot's of banks and credit unions offer preapprovals for cards with an attached credit limit but they are not 100% a sure thing. If inquiries didn't hurt then it would be a lot easier to figure out what creditors want what for a particular credit limit. As far as Juniper goes, I have two personal and one biz card with them, all acquired within 18 months time. Who knows for sure?
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