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New Member
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
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Good scores, why no credit?

I would like to apply for new credit cards or store charge accounts but I got denied by Chase so now I am nervous.
 
TU/EQ/EX are 749/704/689.
 
I have two open credit cards, Cap One at $1500 and a really annoying Orchard Bank at $300.  Both are $0 balances and I also have a Macy's at $1500 ($0 balance) and a Toyota motor loan with an outstanding balance of $2800.
 
I had bunch of accounts in charge-off that I got recalled about 2 years ago and now are paid off as of January.  The one problem was with a Citibank acount that was NOT properlly recalled and kept showing a late balance which I finally just paid off in January when I paid off everything else.  I even tried to show them that the other Citibank card I had was recalled correctly and they don't care.
 
Here's the kicker, I now have two years of late payments on that sh*ty Citibank card because I didn't know that they would keep reporting late payments when there was an overdue balance. EVEN THOUGH I PAID ON TIME FOR 2+ YEARS.  I've called numerous times to explain and they simply won't fix it.  I've sent 5 rounds of correction letters to all three bureaus (Dec-May) and they fix it one month and then Citibank reports it late again and it pops back on.  This is the only thing that is trashing my credit report.  I even started getting letters back from the CBs telling me to stop writing in about this issue.  The balance on that account has been $0 for at least 5-6 months now. 
 
1) How long will it take for Citibank to stop reporting once an account is closed?  I will write the 3 CBs again to try and get it removed and I'm hoping Citibank will "forget" to respond
 
2) What cards can I apply for that only look at the credit score and not the actual report.  My scores seem to be pretty good.
 
* My husband and I have also just bought a house and now we will have a $350K mortgage on our report probably starting in August.
Epic Contributor
Posts: 25,517
Registered: ‎10-23-2007
0

Re: Good scores, why no credit?

all credit cards are going to use a formula that is score plus stuff in reports auto by computer.  You can apply then call the back door number and try a human that you can expain stuff to and they might over ride. I would start with your decline chase and see what they say.
Fico Scores: EQ- 670., TU 710 Sync, EX 728 SoFi(05/04/15)
I'm just trying to catch up to RON1
95 Cards and Counting Smiley Tongue
Senior Contributor
Posts: 3,279
Registered: ‎08-03-2007
0

Re: Good scores, why no credit?

Congrats on the house!
Here we go again...
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