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High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase

New Member

High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase

I have a debate with a friend of mine.  They claim that high-volume spenders & payers are more valuable to credit card company than low volume spenders.  He claims the formula is (annual spending x merchant %) > (maxed credit card x annual percent %). 

 

Here is a list of some of the cards that I have observed provide high-lines of credit:

- Delta Skymies Gold - $15,000

- United Mileage Plus Explorer - $25,000

- Platinum Delta Skymiles Business - $30,000

- Ameriprise World MasterCard - $30,000

- CitiAdvantage Card - $40,000

- Delta Reserve - $60,000

- Chase Ink Bold - $100,000

- American Express Centurion - $250,000

 

From my research, PNC bank defines mass-affluent households with $125,000 annual spending and $100,000 in liquid assets.

 

So my question is if you charge everything on the card an pay it off every month will they raise your credit limit?  Also, do you know the maximum credit lines for any other credit cards so that I can add it to my list?

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 REPLIES
Epic Contributor

Re: High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase


SleezeBall wrote:

I have a debate with a friend of mine.  They claim that high-volume spenders & payers are more valuable to credit card company than low volume spenders.  He claims the formula is (annual spending x merchant %) > (maxed credit card x annual percent %). 

 

Here is a list of some of the cards that I have observed provide high-lines of credit:

- Delta Skymies Gold - $15,000

- United Mileage Plus Explorer - $25,000

- Platinum Delta Skymiles Business - $30,000

- Ameriprise World MasterCard - $30,000

- CitiAdvantage Card - $40,000

- Delta Reserve - $60,000

- Chase Ink Bold - $100,000

- American Express Centurion - $250,000

 

From my research, PNC bank defines mass-affluent households with $125,000 annual spending and $100,000 in liquid assets.

 

So my question is if you charge everything on the card an pay it off every month will they raise your credit limit?  Also, do you know the maximum credit lines for any other credit cards so that I can add it to my list?

 

 

 

 

 

 


Where did this list of credit cards come from? Are you saying those are the highest limits on each of the cards or that you have those lines?

I don't think either way is a sure fire way of getting higher limits.

I myself have seen high limits in past with a combo of high usage and high balance, but at some point you are going to hit a brick wall if you are a high balance carrier...

but it's hard to say and depends on bank etc.

I mean my friend I just helped get into Navy has 4 maxed out lines currently all between $1000-$1500... I didn't realize this and i was SHOCKED once I saw the credit report after Navy Instantly Approving $6k.

it's hard to say when it's computer driven vs. manual also.

Also is someone holding 10 cards with $20k+ limits or is a person using 1 or 2.

 

I would lean towards if you have $30k+ limits especially limits up in the $50-$100k range... I would think you would just have 1 or 2 cards or 1 Amex Charge... you don't really deal with limits at all when you are up in that spending area.

Established Contributor

Re: High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase


So my question is if you charge everything on the card an pay it off every month will they raise your credit limit?


Plain and simply, yes. While there are obvious other factors involved like income, credit score, credit history, etc., in general, CCC's like heavy spending and will reward you for it.

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New Member

Re: High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase - $800 a week

Thank you for your input.  Sounds like my friend, who referred me to this website, who spends $800 per week and pays it off weekly is on his way to a high-limit credit card.  he argues that he only wants two (2) high limit cards where as his relative has a dozen credits with over $20K on each card.   so basically i should do what they are doing ... charge everything on the card and keep it paid off weekly? 

 

suggestions?

Established Contributor

Re: High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase - $800 a week

Weekly payments aren't really necessary. You can pay once or twice a month. As long as you are using your card and paying it before the due date, the credit card company will like you.

 

Personally, I prefer to pay weekly, just because it helps keep my spending under control. 

Discover IT $35K | FNBO Visa $30K | Cash+ Visa Sig $19.5K | Southwest Premier $16K | Priceline $15K | Citi Forward $14.3K | US Bank Plat $14K | Commerce Bank $13K | CSP $13K | CSR $10K | Sallie Mae World MC $10K | Lowe’s Consumer 10K | BoA Cash Rewards 1-2-3 Sig $7.5K | Fidelity Visa $7K | Citi Double Cash $6.5K | WF Cash Back Visa $5.4K | Capital One Cash Rewards $5K | AMEX BCE $3.9K | Freedom $2.5K | Younkers/Comenity $2.4K | Kohl’s 1.5K | Target $1.4K | EX FICO (from AMEX): 768, TU FICO (from Discover): 797, AAoA: 4.4 years
Valued Contributor

Re: High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase


andre181 wrote:

So my question is if you charge everything on the card an pay it off every month will they raise your credit limit?


Plain and simply, yes. While there are obvious other factors involved like income, credit score, credit history, etc., in general, CCC's like heavy spending and will reward you for it.


+1. For prime lenders this is very much true. Yes CCCs make money on those who are continuously slugged with interest, but common sense says that if they're carrying a balance for that long the lender may be unable to collect all of what they're owed when the time comes. More often than not people in this situation will hang on for as long as they can before defaulting on their obligations. If they had the ability to actually pay what they owe, they wouldn't need to carry a balance with high APRs for so long. On the other hand high spenders typically generate superior revenue via swipe fees with a much lower risk of default.
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Valued Contributor

Re: High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase - $800 a week


andre181 wrote:

Weekly payments aren't really necessary. You can pay once or twice a month. As long as you are using your card and paying it before the due date, the credit card company will like you.

 

Personally, I prefer to pay weekly, just because it helps keep my spending under control. 


+1 !

Also be aware that some companies have a limit on how you can pay, if paying via their website.  Wells Fargo, for example, will only allow 2 payments a month from their website.  Anything beyond that, you'll have to push through your bank or credit union.  Chase/JPMorgan has a 3 day restriction rule, can't pay a bill in less than 3 days (stupid rule if you ask me!).  Of course, you can always push payments as frequently as you want, through your bank or credit union. 

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Established Contributor

Re: High-Volume Spenders vs Credit Line Increase

I really think it has a lot to do with usage, and PIF.... Banks love when u pay if full as it demonstrates responsible use... I can only share my personal experiences.... BOA loves it, they will treat you really well. Chase also a great bank, but they become very worried when you max out and quickly try to either lower the credit line or close you out. But if you speak to the right people you can usually get your line back open...