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Frequent Contributor
jake619
Posts: 496
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.

Does the 50,000 points for 5 nights imply the cost of the room is $100 per night?

GangnamFICO wrote:

Because the chicks dig it when I throw down the card to the waiter and...it comes in handy if I'm short on cash until payday and need a short spot. AMEX gets the booty, and that's important when you're a Pirate.


Minor vulgarity edit --Rev



Valued Contributor
MrShush
Posts: 1,412
Registered: ‎04-18-2008

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.


jake619 wrote:
Does the 50,000 points for 5 nights imply the cost of the room is $100 per night?

That I do not know. I haven't played with the site yet to determine the redemption rate nor do I feel like digging out the disclosures--yeah, lazy. I believe the rates aren't a factor as is the category (1 through 7) of hotel.

 

Oh, clutch signature! I read that post and laughed pretty hard and thought I might grab it for my sig!

Frequent Contributor
jake619
Posts: 496
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.

Got it. Youre probably right. I just saw pretty simple math and went for it.

GangnamFICO wrote:

Because the chicks dig it when I throw down the card to the waiter and...it comes in handy if I'm short on cash until payday and need a short spot. AMEX gets the booty, and that's important when you're a Pirate.


Minor vulgarity edit --Rev



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FrugalRican
Posts: 2,876
Registered: ‎02-02-2012

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.

I have the Chase Hyatt Visa and I think it's REALLY worth it if you have the Freedom/CSP.

I don't have the CSP, but I still have the Hyatt because of the free night. There's more perks to the card, but as a "spender", I barely touch the actual card.

 

If I had the CSP, I'd be a transferring fool.

You get better value for spending on the Freedom, transferring to the CSP and then transferring to the Hyatt.

 

But again, I don't spend on the Hyatt Visa itself because it's just not worth it at all.

 

The first two nights I got for free apply to a two night stay at ANY Hyatt in the world.

After that, the one night applies from categories 1 to 4.

 

If you're not a low profile spender, then there are better cards than it though. SPG being one of them.

Follow my financial journey: http://www.frugalrican.com


EQ FICO (01/16/2012): 656 - EQ FICO (02/16/2012): 743 - EQ (02/24/2012): 760 - EX (04/28/2012): 739 - GOAL 2013: 800+

AMEX BCE (0/10K) --- BOA 1-2-3 (0/15.9K) --- Discover More (0/6K) --- Chase Freedom Visa (0/1.4K) -- Hyatt Visa Sign. (0/5.8K) -- Barclay's NFL Card (0/7.5K) -- Chase Sapphire Preferred (0/5K)

Valued Contributor
CreditScholar
Posts: 2,300
Registered: ‎01-22-2012

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.


jake619 wrote:
Does the 50,000 points for 5 nights imply the cost of the room is $100 per night?

No, each hotel is assigned a category number based on popularity. The number of points needed for a free night depends on which category it's in. For example the Marriott in Singapore is a category 7, which costs 35k per night. The Marriott at Burbank Airport is a category 4, which costs 20k per night. If you redeem 5 nights at once then the 5th night is free. Marriott's program is heavily tilted towards those stay in Marriott hotels, and in general heavy spending on their credit card offers a poor return compared to others (notably SPG and Hyatt). Marriott points are most valuable when redeemed under 2 circumstances: large quantities of 100k or more for expensive multi-night stays or travel packages, and 1 night award stays combined with a paid night for Megabonus qualification. 

FICOs: EX: 826, EQ: 817, TU: 810
Bank of America Privileges with Travel Rewards Visa Signature - $23,200 CL
Chase Sapphire Preferred Visa Signature - $12,700 CL
Chase United MileagePlus Club World Elite MasterCard - $26,500 CL
Citibank American Airlines Executive World Elite MasterCard - $22,500 CL
J.P. Morgan Ritz Carlton Visa Signature - $23,500 CL
Valued Contributor
MrShush
Posts: 1,412
Registered: ‎04-18-2008

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.


CreditScholar wrote:

jake619 wrote:
Does the 50,000 points for 5 nights imply the cost of the room is $100 per night?

No, each hotel is assigned a category number based on popularity. The number of points needed for a free night depends on which category it's in. For example the Marriott in Singapore is a category 7, which costs 35k per night. The Marriott at Burbank Airport is a category 4, which costs 20k per night. If you redeem 5 nights at once then the 5th night is free. Marriott's program is heavily tilted towards those stay in Marriott hotels, and in general heavy spending on their credit card offers a poor return compared to others (notably SPG and Hyatt). Marriott points are most valuable when redeemed under 2 circumstances: large quantities of 100k or more for expensive multi-night stays or travel packages, and 1 night award stays combined with a paid night for Megabonus qualification. 


I'm looking at the site for a booking next month in San Diego. Not a desirable time of year but  75,000 points over 3 days.

 

The card does offer 2x points on dinner, airline tickets, and rental cars.

Valued Contributor
CreditScholar
Posts: 2,300
Registered: ‎01-22-2012

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.


MrShush wrote:

CreditScholar wrote:

jake619 wrote:
Does the 50,000 points for 5 nights imply the cost of the room is $100 per night?

No, each hotel is assigned a category number based on popularity. The number of points needed for a free night depends on which category it's in. For example the Marriott in Singapore is a category 7, which costs 35k per night. The Marriott at Burbank Airport is a category 4, which costs 20k per night. If you redeem 5 nights at once then the 5th night is free. Marriott's program is heavily tilted towards those stay in Marriott hotels, and in general heavy spending on their credit card offers a poor return compared to others (notably SPG and Hyatt). Marriott points are most valuable when redeemed under 2 circumstances: large quantities of 100k or more for expensive multi-night stays or travel packages, and 1 night award stays combined with a paid night for Megabonus qualification. 


I'm looking at the site for a booking next month in San Diego. Not a desirable time of year but  75,000 points over 3 days.

 

The card does offer 2x points on dinner, airline tickets, and rental cars.


It does, but then again so does the Hyatt card. I stayed a few nights at the Hyatt at Mission Bay 2 months ago, which is a category 4. That's 15k per night, compared to the Marriott which is 25k. Given that both cards offer 2x on dining, airfare and rental cars, you'll reach 15k with Hyatt much faster than 25k with Marriott through CC spend alone.

FICOs: EX: 826, EQ: 817, TU: 810
Bank of America Privileges with Travel Rewards Visa Signature - $23,200 CL
Chase Sapphire Preferred Visa Signature - $12,700 CL
Chase United MileagePlus Club World Elite MasterCard - $26,500 CL
Citibank American Airlines Executive World Elite MasterCard - $22,500 CL
J.P. Morgan Ritz Carlton Visa Signature - $23,500 CL
Valued Contributor
MrShush
Posts: 1,412
Registered: ‎04-18-2008

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.


CreditScholar wrote:

MrShush wrote:

CreditScholar wrote:

jake619 wrote:
Does the 50,000 points for 5 nights imply the cost of the room is $100 per night?

No, each hotel is assigned a category number based on popularity. The number of points needed for a free night depends on which category it's in. For example the Marriott in Singapore is a category 7, which costs 35k per night. The Marriott at Burbank Airport is a category 4, which costs 20k per night. If you redeem 5 nights at once then the 5th night is free. Marriott's program is heavily tilted towards those stay in Marriott hotels, and in general heavy spending on their credit card offers a poor return compared to others (notably SPG and Hyatt). Marriott points are most valuable when redeemed under 2 circumstances: large quantities of 100k or more for expensive multi-night stays or travel packages, and 1 night award stays combined with a paid night for Megabonus qualification. 


I'm looking at the site for a booking next month in San Diego. Not a desirable time of year but  75,000 points over 3 days.

 

The card does offer 2x points on dinner, airline tickets, and rental cars.


It does, but then again so does the Hyatt card. I stayed a few nights at the Hyatt at Mission Bay 2 months ago, which is a category 4. That's 15k per night, compared to the Marriott which is 25k. Given that both cards offer 2x on dining, airfare and rental cars, you'll reach 15k with Hyatt much faster than 25k with Marriott through CC spend alone.


The ONLY reason I chose the Marriott over any other was because of a stay in Scottsdale. The resort was wonderful, service outstanding, overall great experience.

 

I wasn't even in the market for a hotel card but at my wife's encouragement, I took the bait. Between this and the Delta Gold, this upcoming jaunt is heavily subsidized.

Valued Contributor
CreditScholar
Posts: 2,300
Registered: ‎01-22-2012

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.


MrShush wrote:

CreditScholar wrote:

MrShush wrote:

CreditScholar wrote:

jake619 wrote:
Does the 50,000 points for 5 nights imply the cost of the room is $100 per night?

No, each hotel is assigned a category number based on popularity. The number of points needed for a free night depends on which category it's in. For example the Marriott in Singapore is a category 7, which costs 35k per night. The Marriott at Burbank Airport is a category 4, which costs 20k per night. If you redeem 5 nights at once then the 5th night is free. Marriott's program is heavily tilted towards those stay in Marriott hotels, and in general heavy spending on their credit card offers a poor return compared to others (notably SPG and Hyatt). Marriott points are most valuable when redeemed under 2 circumstances: large quantities of 100k or more for expensive multi-night stays or travel packages, and 1 night award stays combined with a paid night for Megabonus qualification. 


I'm looking at the site for a booking next month in San Diego. Not a desirable time of year but  75,000 points over 3 days.

 

The card does offer 2x points on dinner, airline tickets, and rental cars.


It does, but then again so does the Hyatt card. I stayed a few nights at the Hyatt at Mission Bay 2 months ago, which is a category 4. That's 15k per night, compared to the Marriott which is 25k. Given that both cards offer 2x on dining, airfare and rental cars, you'll reach 15k with Hyatt much faster than 25k with Marriott through CC spend alone.


The ONLY reason I chose the Marriott over any other was because of a stay in Scottsdale. The resort was wonderful, service outstanding, overall great experience.

 

I wasn't even in the market for a hotel card but at my wife's encouragement, I took the bait. Between this and the Delta Gold, this upcoming jaunt is heavily subsidized.


I completely agree in that Marriott has some nice places and advantages. In many cases I will go out of my way to stay at a Marriott because of how it feels (for example the JW Marriott in Seoul was amazing whereas the Park Hyatt was too contemporary for my tastes). From my experiences JWs are a good blend of luxury without being too over the top. Some aspects of luxury I can understand, while other things simply annoy me such as having my napkin re-folded every time I get up from my seat. I'd prefer they spend their time doing something else instead. I just made the previous statements from a pure value perspective. 

FICOs: EX: 826, EQ: 817, TU: 810
Bank of America Privileges with Travel Rewards Visa Signature - $23,200 CL
Chase Sapphire Preferred Visa Signature - $12,700 CL
Chase United MileagePlus Club World Elite MasterCard - $26,500 CL
Citibank American Airlines Executive World Elite MasterCard - $22,500 CL
J.P. Morgan Ritz Carlton Visa Signature - $23,500 CL
Frequent Contributor
jake619
Posts: 496
Registered: ‎11-13-2012

Re: Hotel cards that pay for itself.


MrShush wrote:

I'm looking at the site for a booking next month in San Diego. Not a desirable time of year but  75,000 points over 3 days.

 


Thanks for explaining the category system. Makes sense. 

BTW, and I might be completely biased, but I have yet to find a non-desirable time of year in SD.:smileyhappy:


GangnamFICO wrote:

Because the chicks dig it when I throw down the card to the waiter and...it comes in handy if I'm short on cash until payday and need a short spot. AMEX gets the booty, and that's important when you're a Pirate.


Minor vulgarity edit --Rev




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