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Regular Contributor
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎11-01-2009
0

Re: How should I raise my score?

Thanks! I have way too many inquires for this year on my reports. I was so anxious to raise my score, I will not apply for anything else for 2 years.

Starting Score: 665
Current Score: 715
Goal Score: 750


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Super Contributor
Posts: 5,759
Registered: ‎01-28-2008
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Re: How should I raise my score?


keith021 wrote:
Thanks! I have way too many inquires for this year on my reports. I was so anxious to raise my score, I will not apply for anything else for 2 years.

Just know that inquiries are only calculated into your FICO scores for one year.  But, the inquiries will appear on your credit reports for two years.  With that said, there's no need to go on an app spree after one year.  Let them all fall off after the two years.  Good luck!! 

Moderator
Posts: 17,419
Registered: ‎07-14-2009
0

Re: How should I raise my score?

This is from this site:

 


Improving your FICO® credit score

 

It’s important to note that raising your FICO credit score is a bit like losing weight: It takes time and there is no quick fix. In fact, quick-fix efforts can backfire. The best advice is to manage credit responsibly over time. See how much money you can save by just following these tips and raising your credit score.

Payment History Tips
  • Pay your bills on time.
    Delinquent payments and collections can have a major negative impact on your FICO score.
  • If you have missed payments, get current and stay current.
    The longer you pay your bills on time, the better your credit score.
  • Be aware that paying off a collection account will not remove it from your credit report.
    It will stay on your report for seven years.
  • If you are having trouble making ends meet, contact your creditors or see a legitimate credit counselor.
    This won't improve your credit score immediately, but if you can begin to manage your credit and pay on time, your score will get better over time.
Amounts Owed Tips
  • Keep balances low on credit cards and other “revolving credit”.
    High outstanding debt can affect a credit score.
  • Pay off debt rather than moving it around.
    The most effective way to improve your credit score in this area is by paying down your revolving credit. In fact, owing the same amount but having fewer open accounts may lower your score.
  • Don't close unused credit cards as a short-term strategy to raise your score.
  • Don't open a number of new credit cards that you don't need, just to increase your available credit.
    This approach could backfire and actually lower your credit score.
Length of Credit History Tips
  • If you have been managing credit for a short time, don't open a lot of new accounts too rapidly.
    New accounts will lower your average account age, which will have a larger effect on your score if you don't have a lot of other credit information. Also, rapid account buildup can look risky if you are a new credit user.
New Credit Tips
  • Do your rate shopping for a given loan within a focused period of time.
    FICO scores distinguish between a search for a single loan and a search for many new credit lines, in part by the length of time over which inquiries occur.
  • Re-establish your credit history if you have had problems.
    Opening new accounts responsibly and paying them off on time will raise your credit score in the long term.
  • Note that it's OK to request and check your own credit report.
    This won't affect your score, as long as you order your credit report directly from the credit reporting agency or through an organization authorized to provide credit reports to consumers.
Types of Credit Use Tips
  • Apply for and open new credit accounts only as needed.
    Don't open accounts just to have a better credit mix - it probably won't raise your credit score.
  • Have credit cards - but manage them responsibly.
    In general, having credit cards and installment loans (and paying timely payments) will raise your credit score. Someone with no credit cards, for example, tends to be higher risk than someone who has managed credit cards responsibly.
  • Note that closing an account doesn't make it go away.
    A closed account will still show up on your credit report, and may be considered by the score.

 

 

At this point I have to agree that time is your best friend. Be patient and do the things listed above and your scores will take care of themselves. Continue to research and learn and learn some more. No one will ever have all the answers. I wish I had been curious about proper credit management as you are at age 18!!!

 

Good luck to you.

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