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Established Contributor
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Registered: ‎05-05-2016
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN


tmiw wrote:

mountaindewvoltage wrote:

Harley14 wrote:
I'd be in a lot of trouble if they were randomly assigned pins.
I'd also suspect many lenders would see many cards cancelled. I for one couldn't keep up with the numbers. So I'd cancel everything and just have 1 or 2 cards. I havd pins for everything at work. And after a week I tend to forget those of I've been off.

Are you trying to say Americans are dumber than everyone else in the world? 

 

The rest of the world uses PINs... It's really not that hard to remember a four digit number. 


I guarantee that if you read sites like Not Always Right or reddit's /r/TalesFromRetail, you might start to wonder...

 

(Also, there are other chip and signature countries. It's not like the US is the only one, it's just the biggest.)


Too lazy to look it up, but those are probably super small countries, especially compared to the size of the U.S. 

 

So not only is there less ciruculation of cash through cards, but there's most likely less criminals, so less crime where signature can be an effective term. In those countries, signatures are probably validated by using the card signature on the back and the signature on the reciept, unlike here. 

Established Contributor
Posts: 749
Registered: ‎11-15-2014
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN


mountaindewvoltage wrote:

tmiw wrote:

mountaindewvoltage wrote:

Harley14 wrote:
I'd be in a lot of trouble if they were randomly assigned pins.
I'd also suspect many lenders would see many cards cancelled. I for one couldn't keep up with the numbers. So I'd cancel everything and just have 1 or 2 cards. I havd pins for everything at work. And after a week I tend to forget those of I've been off.

Are you trying to say Americans are dumber than everyone else in the world? 

 

The rest of the world uses PINs... It's really not that hard to remember a four digit number. 


I guarantee that if you read sites like Not Always Right or reddit's /r/TalesFromRetail, you might start to wonder...

 

(Also, there are other chip and signature countries. It's not like the US is the only one, it's just the biggest.)


Too lazy to look it up, but those are probably super small countries, especially compared to the size of the U.S. 

 

So not only is there less ciruculation of cash through cards, but there's most likely less criminals, so less crime where signature can be an effective term. In those countries, signatures are probably validated by using the card signature on the back and the signature on the reciept, unlike here. 


https://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/rr-commpublic/visa-meeting-20140305.pdf

 

Some of those have a fair number of people living in them.

Super Contributor
Posts: 6,236
Registered: ‎02-23-2011

Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN


mountaindewvoltage wrote:

Harley14 wrote:
I'd be in a lot of trouble if they were randomly assigned pins.
I'd also suspect many lenders would see many cards cancelled. I for one couldn't keep up with the numbers. So I'd cancel everything and just have 1 or 2 cards. I havd pins for everything at work. And after a week I tend to forget those of I've been off.

Are you trying to say Americans are dumber than everyone else in the world? 

 

The rest of the world uses PINs... It's really not that hard to remember a four digit number. 


1.  Rest of the world has nothing to do with US domestic choices.  We do things differently within each State, let alone trying to conform globally.  How's the plan the past 50 years to try and force the metric system on us?  

 

2.  Agreed.  A single 4 digit pin used on all cards would be easy to remember, but less secure.  You think a person with 10 cards and 10 different pins would remember all of them a year from now on the 8 SD'ed cards?

 

After a year or two, I can't even remember unique passwords or ATM pins, unless I use the same one for all of them.

Established Contributor
Posts: 872
Registered: ‎05-05-2016
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN


Open123 wrote:

mountaindewvoltage wrote:

Harley14 wrote:
I'd be in a lot of trouble if they were randomly assigned pins.
I'd also suspect many lenders would see many cards cancelled. I for one couldn't keep up with the numbers. So I'd cancel everything and just have 1 or 2 cards. I havd pins for everything at work. And after a week I tend to forget those of I've been off.

Are you trying to say Americans are dumber than everyone else in the world? 

 

The rest of the world uses PINs... It's really not that hard to remember a four digit number. 


1.  Rest of the world has nothing to do with US domestic choices.  We do things differently within each State, let alone trying to conform globally.  How's the plan the past 50 years to try and force the metric system on us?  

 

2.  Agreed.  A single 4 digit pin used on all cards would be easy to remember, but less secure.  You think a person with 10 cards and 10 different pins would remember all of them a year from now on the 8 SD'ed cards?

 

After a year or two, I can't even remember unique passwords or ATM pins, unless I use the same one for all of them.


1. More like we do everything backwards and things that cater to the 1% so the average American actually lives a worst lifestyle than those who live in other first world or even second world countries. 

 

2. Would be more secure, especially if someone could choose their own PIN. Now idiot Mark can't pick up Janet's card off the ground and go use it at a local Target.

Established Contributor
Posts: 749
Registered: ‎11-15-2014
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN


mountaindewvoltage wrote:

2. Would be more secure, especially if someone could choose their own PIN. Now idiot Mark can't pick up Janet's card off the ground and go use it at a local Target.


Sure, but is it honestly worth the hassle and cost on all sides? We're still not liable for fraud either way, not to mention that cards will actually shut down instantly once reported lost/stolen through our banks' mobile apps (vs. in some other countries where that isn't the case).

 

Besides, we're adopting chip late enough where it's completely possible that it won't be used for very long. We'll see if we end up adopting mobile payment though.

Established Contributor
Posts: 872
Registered: ‎05-05-2016
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN


tmiw wrote:

mountaindewvoltage wrote:

2. Would be more secure, especially if someone could choose their own PIN. Now idiot Mark can't pick up Janet's card off the ground and go use it at a local Target.


Sure, but is it honestly worth the hassle and cost on all sides? We're still not liable for fraud either way, not to mention that cards will actually shut down instantly once reported lost/stolen through our banks' mobile apps (vs. in some other countries where that isn't the case).

 

Besides, we're adopting chip late enough where it's completely possible that it won't be used for very long. We'll see if we end up adopting mobile payment though.


Personally I think it is. I've wanted to go back to using a debit card for the majority of my purchases, but with the state of the American payment system, it's hard to. We may not technically be liable for fraud I guess, but debit cards don't have nearly the same protections of credit cards unless you're banking through a bank who goes above and beyond about fraud like Bank of America. 

Established Contributor
Posts: 749
Registered: ‎11-15-2014
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN


mountaindewvoltage wrote:

tmiw wrote:

mountaindewvoltage wrote:

2. Would be more secure, especially if someone could choose their own PIN. Now idiot Mark can't pick up Janet's card off the ground and go use it at a local Target.


Sure, but is it honestly worth the hassle and cost on all sides? We're still not liable for fraud either way, not to mention that cards will actually shut down instantly once reported lost/stolen through our banks' mobile apps (vs. in some other countries where that isn't the case).

 

Besides, we're adopting chip late enough where it's completely possible that it won't be used for very long. We'll see if we end up adopting mobile payment though.


Personally I think it is. I've wanted to go back to using a debit card for the majority of my purchases, but with the state of the American payment system, it's hard to. We may not technically be liable for fraud I guess, but debit cards don't have nearly the same protections of credit cards unless you're banking through a bank who goes above and beyond about fraud like Bank of America. 


Out of curiosity, why do you want to use a debit card for most stuff? 

Contributor
Posts: 77
Registered: ‎09-29-2016
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN

Chip and signature then it becomes chip and pin then it'll probably be chip and finger print.

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Regular Contributor
Posts: 114
Registered: ‎03-18-2017
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN

I have a "Check ID" statement on mine, and in ten years and who knows how many thousand transactions, there is only one teller at one store who has ever asked to see my ID.  I thanked her for doing so.

 

Signatures are a farce, so even a flawed PIN system can hardly be a downgrade.

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Established Contributor
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Registered: ‎11-15-2014
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Re: Discover switching from Chip/Signature to Chip/PIN

Anyone hear any updates about this? I'm thinking they aren't going to bother but maybe I'm wrong on that.

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