Reply
Established Contributor
kroberts67
Posts: 830
Registered: ‎03-04-2013
0

Re: How many of you have an excel sheet for your CC's???


Roarmeister wrote:

Spreadsheet as in "singular"???

 

Actually, I use several spreadsheets and several tabs within them to track not only my CCs but my investments, net worth, bank accounts, mortgage, budgets, retirement plans, credit scores, history, graphs, important dates. You won't see me post any screen shots but trust me it would be a lot of work to do so!  :smileyhappy:

 

I password lock them just to keep prying eyes away.


This is me, too...  I have one tab as my budget and I've got it through 2016, I've been using this for years and years.  The next tab is my c/c spreadsheet.  If you have more than one or two you MUST keep this.  The 3rd tab is my credit report info.  It was filled out when I was rebuilding, now it's rather empty with all my baddies gone.  But I keep it because I've listed what company pulls which CR and keeps track of my INQ and so on.  I check it every day and now keep on dropbox so that I can access it wherever I am, instead of updating then emailing to myself between home & work & lap[top & desktop etc.  Loves me some Dropbox!!

 

 



FICO: EQ 722 | TU 723 | EX 718
SFFCU Visa $11.3k + LOC $5k, USAA Amex $6k, USAA MC $7k, Amex BCE $13.5k, Cap1 $4k, Freedom $5k, Slate $3.2k, Barclays SM $5k.

My Credit Repair Journey
Frequent Contributor
Roarmeister
Posts: 331
Registered: ‎04-21-2012
0

Re: How many of you have an excel sheet for your CC's???

[ Edited ]

yudeology101 wrote:

Roarmeister wrote:

Spreadsheet as in "singular"???

 

Actually, I use several spreadsheets and several tabs within them to track not only my CCs but my investments, net worth, bank accounts, mortgage, budgets, retirement plans, credit scores, history, graphs, important dates. You won't see me post any screen shots but trust me it would be a lot of work to do so!  :smileyhappy:

 

I password lock them just to keep prying eyes away.


Wow, this would be something interesting to get my hands on, too.  Did you make it your own or did you get it from somewhere? 


 

I borrowed one spreadsheet posted here for calculating AAoA and I realized that it needed a lot of work and I also realized the calculations were off.  The rest - I've been creating various sheets for various calculations as I think of them.  For example my investment sheet tallies the totals from my various accounts from other spreadsheets and generates a net worth.  I have XX% in my home, XX% in my RRSPs, XX% in precious metals, etc. Some of the sheets generate graphs so I can track visually any trends that are happening.  I have another that tracks my changing payment & amortization of my mortgage (I'm about 8 years ahead on a 25 yr mortgage - FWIW). I also track my credit score from Equifax and TransUnion so I can estimate fairly reasonably what kind of change will be generated as I pay down my balances or apply for new credit or get CLIs or when inquires drop off. Another sheet tracks percentiles and quartiles of US and Canadian credit scores.  For example: median (50 percentile) Fico score in the US is 723, in Canada it is 768 and deliquincy rates are dramatically lower and NOBODY has a score below 500.  Incidentally, US scores have improved significantly since 2008.  I trracked my history of credit scores which ranged from 676 to 807 and everything inbetween.  I know when I could CLI each card because I track the dates (CLI for Amex coming up on Sunday).  I know when I am eligible for my next colour spade (silver in 17 days) by autotracking how many days in the garden!  I know the dates of when my CLs report, how long it takes for the report to show up on my credit score, how long of a grace period I have and the date due.  Then I schedule automatic payments and transfers with my bank.  I also use online budget calculators from my bank except I found out that I really didn't know where my discretionary money was being spent!  :smileyhappy:

 

I don't think any of my spreadsheets are all that sophisticated - I just use the basic math functions.  No time-value calculations, although that might prove interesting.  No pivot tables because I don't even know what they do!  A lot of the sheets were generated out of my direct concern for not really knowing how my RRSPs were doing during the 2008 crisis and from trying to figure out when I could retire (best guess is 66 or 67 after the crisis but I could have retired at 62 if it wasn't for the crisis and subsequent stock meltdown).

 

I've been taking evening classes to eventually get my Dip BAdmin and I've learned a lot from this board.  But mostly I just read a lot of s**t off the web and from books.

AMEX_PlatinumBMOWorldMCCapOnePlatinumMBNA_Platinum+ScotiaMomentum
____$25k_______$20k_______$20k_______$25k_______$25k____
Starting Score: 676 Feb 2008; Current Score: 788 EQ, 814 TU, October 2014; Goal Score: 800 by end of year Oldest Account reported by EQ: 12 years; EQ AAoA: 5.6 years; EQ Credit Utilization: 3.5%
Valued Contributor
takeshi74
Posts: 2,803
Registered: ‎06-05-2013
0

Re: How many of you have an excel sheet for your CC's???

[ Edited ]

Mine's not only for CC's but replaces the checkbook register and is used for very crude budgeting.  It's kept in a TrueCrypt volume in Dropbox for easy access anywhere.

 


ac921ol wrote:

 

next part is if any of you have an excel sheet, would you been kind enough to send it on over, that way I dont need to mess with the layout and what not, or if someone knows where I can grab one online that would be grand.


If you "don't feel like messing with it:" then mine won't be for you.  I recommend messing with it as you need a good understanding of how your works.  Just get started and work with it.  You can change and adapt it over time.  Mine is quite different from how it started out and it's designed with my specific preferences in mind.  You'd be better served designing your own.  I'm sure quick Googling will turn up plenty of examples if you still want them.

 

As just an example, my workbook tracks every single transaction on all accounts and is designed for reconciliation.  There are formulas to help with reconciliation for the checking account but it's more of a manual process for the credit cards.  I break everything down into periods based on my pay cycles and the CC tab keeps current balances for every period as well as current utilization, both individual and overall.  The only other info I keep are the credit limits, APR's, due dates and statement close dates.  What you want or don't want may be entirely different.  Just sit down, think it out and start plugging away.  It's electronic and you have cut and paste so it's very easy to make changes as desired.

 


Stiga9 wrote:
I would assume everyone of us here has a spreadsheet for our cards :smileywink:

As the old saying goes...

 

Always keep in mind that one size does not fit all.  Some use spreadsheets.  Some us fianance apps.  Some use sites like Mint, Manila, etc.  Some use an old fashioned paper ledger.  Some rely on memory.  Some use a combination.  Some use nothing.

 

 

That reminds me.  For analytics I use Mint.

Senior Contributor
yudeology101
Posts: 4,652
Registered: ‎06-21-2012
0

Re: How many of you have an excel sheet for your CC's???


Roarmeister wrote:

yudeology101 wrote:

Roarmeister wrote:

Spreadsheet as in "singular"???

 

Actually, I use several spreadsheets and several tabs within them to track not only my CCs but my investments, net worth, bank accounts, mortgage, budgets, retirement plans, credit scores, history, graphs, important dates. You won't see me post any screen shots but trust me it would be a lot of work to do so!  :smileyhappy:

 

I password lock them just to keep prying eyes away.


Wow, this would be something interesting to get my hands on, too.  Did you make it your own or did you get it from somewhere? 


 

I borrowed one spreadsheet posted here for calculating AAoA and I realized that it needed a lot of work and I also realized the calculations were off.  The rest - I've been creating various sheets for various calculations as I think of them.  For example my investment sheet tallies the totals from my various accounts from other spreadsheets and generates a net worth.  I have XX% in my home, XX% in my RRSPs, XX% in precious metals, etc. Some of the sheets generate graphs so I can track visually any trends that are happening.  I have another that tracks my changing payment & amortization of my mortgage (I'm about 8 years ahead on a 25 yr mortgage - FWIW). I also track my credit score from Equifax and TransUnion so I can estimate fairly reasonably what kind of change will be generated as I pay down my balances or apply for new credit or get CLIs or when inquires drop off. Another sheet tracks percentiles and quartiles of US and Canadian credit scores.  For example: median (50 percentile) Fico score in the US is 723, in Canada it is 768 and deliquincy rates are dramatically lower and NOBODY has a score below 500.  Incidentally, US scores have improved significantly since 2008.  I trracked my history of credit scores which ranged from 676 to 807 and everything inbetween.  I know when I could CLI each card because I track the dates (CLI for Amex coming up on Sunday).  I know when I am eligible for my next colour spade (silver in 17 days) by autotracking how many days in the garden!  I know the dates of when my CLs report, how long it takes for the report to show up on my credit score, how long of a grace period I have and the date due.  Then I schedule automatic payments and transfers with my bank.  I also use online budget calculators from my bank except I found out that I really didn't know where my discretionary money was being spent!  :smileyhappy:

 

I don't think any of my spreadsheets are all that sophisticated - I just use the basic math functions.  No time-value calculations, although that might prove interesting.  No pivot tables because I don't even know what they do!  A lot of the sheets were generated out of my direct concern for not really knowing how my RRSPs were doing during the 2008 crisis and from trying to figure out when I could retire (best guess is 66 or 67 after the crisis but I could have retired at 62 if it wasn't for the crisis and subsequent stock meltdown).

 

I've been taking evening classes to eventually get my Dip BAdmin and I've learned a lot from this board.  But mostly I just read a lot of s**t off the web and from books.


That's a lot of effort in creating your own.  I'm not really good at spreadsheet formula stuff (like creating what ifs, etc), so the one I've downloaded from one of the members here has helped me out a lot.  

JPM Ritz Carlton $8k I UMP Club $8k I CSP $8k | Chase Hyatt $5k I AMEX Green NPSL I AMEX Delta $2k I Citi AA $2k | C1 QS $4.5k
BOA UNC-CH Alumni $6k I Hawaiian WEMC $3k I Arrival $6.5k I IT $1.5k | Merrill+ $2k | Lowes $12k | Apple $2k | +13more
Scores: EQ:671 (FICO 11) EX:686 (FICO N/C) TU:686 (FICO N/C) *8-5-14*
Overall UTIL: 14% *Gardening Since: 9/12/14*
------------------------------------------------------------
Need to stay out of trouble.... Go Heels!!! ... GC Watchlist ( #1 as of 12-12-13)

myFICO is the consumer division of FICO. Since its introduction 20 years ago, the FICO® Score has become a global standard for measuring credit risk in the banking, mortgage, credit card, auto and retail industries. 90 of the top 100 largest U.S. financial institutions use the FICO Score to make consumer credit decisions.

>> About myFICO
FICO Score - The Score that matters
Click to Verify - This site chose VeriSign SSL for secure e-commerce and confidential communications.
Fair Isaac Corporation is a BBB Accredited Financial Service in San Rafael, CA
FOLLOW US Social Media Facebook Twitter Pinterest Google+
}