Credit Cards Center Credit cards from our partners
Reply
New Member
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-12-2017

How do newly rich athletes get a Centurion card? Is it...

...just about the fact they are newly minted millionaires? I was always just curious. Sometimes you'll see a photo of an athlete right out of college or only a couple of years removed flashing his AMEX black card. In their case, is it really just about the money? I thought more went into it than that. Like, could someone with bad credit that suddenly won that 1.5 billion dollar lottery last year get a black card? I wish this applied to me, but I'm curious anyway.

Senior Contributor
Posts: 4,863
Registered: ‎04-23-2016

Re: How do newly rich athletes get a Centurion card? Is it...

If i won 1.5 billion i wouldnt care to have a black card, id make my own out of Wolverines' adamantanium( spelling lol ) Smiley Wink
Regular Contributor
Posts: 163
Registered: ‎07-16-2012

Re: How do newly rich athletes get a Centurion card? Is it...

[ Edited ]

I'm friends with some athletes in the NBA, and I've asked them about this. here's what they told me:

1. AmEx approached them after they inked their rookie deals, and went in the lottery.

2. Their agents called someone they knew at Amex in that division on their behalf.

It's also plausible that if an agent has a Business centurion, he added his client as an AU. Some of those guys will do anything under the sun to sign a big name. I've known some that have guaranteed loans against future earnings for the athletes they represent. 




Scores: 745 TU (Barclay), 743 EX (Fico8)

Chase Freedom Unlimited (6k), CSP (20k), Amex Delta Platinum (13.5k), Barclay Apple (12.5k), USBank Flexperks Travel Rewards (9k)
Frequent Contributor
Posts: 376
Registered: ‎12-13-2015

Re: How do newly rich athletes get a Centurion card? Is it...

[ Edited ]

EBay.  AliExpress.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 1,720
Registered: ‎03-03-2015

Re: How do newly rich athletes get a Centurion card? Is it...


Yohann wrote:

...just about the fact they are newly minted millionaires? I was always just curious. Sometimes you'll see a photo of an athlete right out of college or only a couple of years removed flashing his AMEX black card. In their case, is it really just about the money? I thought more went into it than that. Like, could someone with bad credit that suddenly won that 1.5 billion dollar lottery last year get a black card? I wish this applied to me, but I'm curious anyway.


Amex has a brand specialist team that works very hard to get their products into celebrity (and high-profile) people's hands. This can include overlooking even the worst credit reports to get the product out there. 

 

Theyre re not the only company that does this. The owner of our company is always being approached by Amex and Citi because they want him to be seen in public with their cards. Amex has offered him a no annual fee Centurion card in the past, after his name was in the press for a takeover of a sports team. He happens to be a fan of BoA, so doesn't see any need to change it up. 


In the garden since 4/10/17 - Blispay Smiley Happy
Starting scores:
552 EQ, 570 TU, 558 EX Current scores (4/11/17): 737 EQ 692 TU 730 EX
Valued Contributor
Posts: 1,935
Registered: ‎05-05-2010

Re: How do newly rich athletes get a Centurion card? Is it...


Yohann wrote:

...just about the fact they are newly minted millionaires? I was always just curious. Sometimes you'll see a photo of an athlete right out of college or only a couple of years removed flashing his AMEX black card. In their case, is it really just about the money? I thought more went into it than that. Like, could someone with bad credit that suddenly won that 1.5 billion dollar lottery last year get a black card? I wish this applied to me, but I'm curious anyway.


Marketing.

Forums posts are not provided or commissioned by FICO. Forums posts have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by FICO. It is not FICO's responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

† Advertiser Disclosure: The listings that appear on myFICO are from companies from which myFICO receives compensation, which may impact how and where products appear on myFICO (including, for example, the order in which they appear). myFICO does not review or include all companies or all available products.
‡ Credit cards for FICO Score ranges: The score ranges are guidelines based on internal myFICO analysis of actual applicant approvals, and having a FICO Score in a particular range does not guarantee you will be approved for credit cards recommended in that range. These ranges were not provided by any card issuer.

* For complete information, see the terms and conditions on the credit card issuer’s website. Once you click apply for this card, you will be directed to the issuer’s website where you may review the terms and conditions of the card before applying. While myFICO always strives to present the most accurate information, we show a summary to help you choose a product, not the full legal terms - and before applying you should understand the full terms of products as stated by the issuer itself.

Copyright ©2001-2015 Fair Isaac Corporation. All rights reserved.   | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Sitemap

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: All FICO® Score products made available on myFICO.com include a FICO® Score 8, along with additional FICO® Score versions. Your lender or insurer may use a different FICO® Score than the versions you receive from myFICO, or another type of credit score altogether. Learn more

FICO, myFICO, Score Watch, The score lenders use, and The Score That Matters are trademarks or registered trademarks of Fair Isaac Corporation. Equifax Credit Report is a trademark of Equifax, Inc. and its affiliated companies. Many factors affect your FICO Score and the interest rates you may receive. Fair Isaac is not a credit repair organization as defined under federal or state law, including the Credit Repair Organizations Act. Fair Isaac does not provide "credit repair" services or advice or assistance regarding "rebuilding" or "improving" your credit record, credit history or credit rating. FTC's website on credit.