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Overall Credit Limit Increase

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Overall Credit Limit Increase

So I know the general assumption with Chase is that they will provide you a total credit limit at about 50% of your reported income. Does that include business+personal cards?

 

Also, out of curiosity, how do people get their credit limits to be so high? I had a 20K limit on my CSR for a while, but outside of that, the highest limit I've ever gotten is 17K, which isn't low, but I've seen a lot of people with limits in the 30-40K range. Is it just based on income or are there other factors? I'm wondering because my score is around 740 and income is above average, but I can't seem to get any high limits. 





[2/2019]
Message 1 of 7
6 REPLIES 6
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Valued Contributor

Re: Overall Credit Limit Increase

A lot could be at play here.

 

Would you mind sharing your AAoA, age of each account, # of inquries accross each bureau, current credit utlization compared to your overall available credit, and scores accross each bureau (you only mention one in your siggy)? 

 

This is in case myFico's finest contributors chime in soon. Smiley Wink

Message 2 of 7
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Re: Overall Credit Limit Increase

Sure. I believe my AAoA is about 11 months, with my AoOA being 22 months, with about 2 or 3 new ones every following 4 months or so. 18 on EX, 10 on EQ, 5 on TU. Credit Utilization is hardly ever above 1%. Total CL is at about 55K right now, though once my new cards report it'll be closer to 70K. 734 on EX, 750 on TU, 752 on EQ. 





[2/2019]
Message 3 of 7
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Re: Overall Credit Limit Increase


@jdbkiang wrote:

So I know the general assumption with Chase is that they will provide you a total credit limit at about 50% of your reported income. Does that include business+personal cards? - Yes, your overall exposure with Chase and other creditors is taken into account.  Both personal and small business cards factor in any decision they may make regarding granting you additional credit.

 

Also, out of curiosity, how do people get their credit limits to be so high? I had a 20K limit on my CSR for a while, but outside of that, the highest limit I've ever gotten is 17K, which isn't low, but I've seen a lot of people with limits in the 30-40K range. Is it just based on income or are there other factors? I'm wondering because my score is around 740 and income is above average, but I can't seem to get any high limits. -  No single element of your credit profile determines what limits you may reach.  Certainly income plays a major role.  A person making $250k/year is far more likely to get a $35-50k credit card vs someone making $40k, assuming everything else is the same.  Nonetheless income while significant is certainly not the only determining factor.  Credit scores (both FICO and any internal score), credit age, time with creditor, stability in housing and employment, limits with other banks,  and many other factors determine the limit that a creditor will give you.  Based on your stats, your AAoA is fairly low so you’ll probably have to wait until that rises quite a bit before many creditors will give you high limits.  Be patient, maintain a great repayment history and in time, you can get high limits relative to your income.


 

Message 4 of 7
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Re: Overall Credit Limit Increase


@Irish80 wrote:

@jdbkiang wrote:

So I know the general assumption with Chase is that they will provide you a total credit limit at about 50% of your reported income. Does that include business+personal cards? - Yes, your overall exposure with Chase and other creditors is taken into account.  Both personal and small business cards factor in any decision they may make regarding granting you additional credit.

 

Also, out of curiosity, how do people get their credit limits to be so high? I had a 20K limit on my CSR for a while, but outside of that, the highest limit I've ever gotten is 17K, which isn't low, but I've seen a lot of people with limits in the 30-40K range. Is it just based on income or are there other factors? I'm wondering because my score is around 740 and income is above average, but I can't seem to get any high limits. -  No single element of your credit profile determines what limits you may reach.  Certainly income plays a major role.  A person making $250k/year is far more likely to get a $35-50k credit card vs someone making $40k, assuming everything else is the same.  Nonetheless income while significant is certainly not the only determining factor.  Credit scores (both FICO and any internal score), credit age, time with creditor, stability in housing and employment, limits with other banks,  and many other factors determine the limit that a creditor will give you.  Based on your stats, your AAoA is fairly low so you’ll probably have to wait until that rises quite a bit before many creditors will give you high limits.  Be patient, maintain a great repayment history and in time, you can get high limits relative to your income.


 


+1 Well said, Irish! Smiley Happy

Message 5 of 7
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Re: Overall Credit Limit Increase


@Irish80 wrote:

@jdbkiang wrote:

So I know the general assumption with Chase is that they will provide you a total credit limit at about 50% of your reported income. Does that include business+personal cards? - Yes, your overall exposure with Chase and other creditors is taken into account.  Both personal and small business cards factor in any decision they may make regarding granting you additional credit.

 

Also, out of curiosity, how do people get their credit limits to be so high? I had a 20K limit on my CSR for a while, but outside of that, the highest limit I've ever gotten is 17K, which isn't low, but I've seen a lot of people with limits in the 30-40K range. Is it just based on income or are there other factors? I'm wondering because my score is around 740 and income is above average, but I can't seem to get any high limits. -  No single element of your credit profile determines what limits you may reach.  Certainly income plays a major role.  A person making $250k/year is far more likely to get a $35-50k credit card vs someone making $40k, assuming everything else is the same.  Nonetheless income while significant is certainly not the only determining factor.  Credit scores (both FICO and any internal score), credit age, time with creditor, stability in housing and employment, limits with other banks,  and many other factors determine the limit that a creditor will give you.  Based on your stats, your AAoA is fairly low so you’ll probably have to wait until that rises quite a bit before many creditors will give you high limits.  Be patient, maintain a great repayment history and in time, you can get high limits relative to your income.


 


+1. Couldn't have said it better myself. Give it some time, maintain the path your on and the limits will go up as your CR ages.



Scores - All bureaus 750 +/-
TCL - Est. $275K
Message 6 of 7
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Re: Overall Credit Limit Increase


@Irish80 wrote:

@jdbkiang wrote:

So I know the general assumption with Chase is that they will provide you a total credit limit at about 50% of your reported income. Does that include business+personal cards? - Yes, your overall exposure with Chase and other creditors is taken into account.  Both personal and small business cards factor in any decision they may make regarding granting you additional credit.

 

Also, out of curiosity, how do people get their credit limits to be so high? I had a 20K limit on my CSR for a while, but outside of that, the highest limit I've ever gotten is 17K, which isn't low, but I've seen a lot of people with limits in the 30-40K range. Is it just based on income or are there other factors? I'm wondering because my score is around 740 and income is above average, but I can't seem to get any high limits. -  No single element of your credit profile determines what limits you may reach.  Certainly income plays a major role.  A person making $250k/year is far more likely to get a $35-50k credit card vs someone making $40k, assuming everything else is the same.  Nonetheless income while significant is certainly not the only determining factor.  Credit scores (both FICO and any internal score), credit age, time with creditor, stability in housing and employment, limits with other banks,  and many other factors determine the limit that a creditor will give you.  Based on your stats, your AAoA is fairly low so you’ll probably have to wait until that rises quite a bit before many creditors will give you high limits.  Be patient, maintain a great repayment history and in time, you can get high limits relative to your income.


 


Thanks for the advice. I guess patience is key! 





[2/2019]
Message 7 of 7
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