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The problem with cashless restaurants

Established Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants

Tender Greens recently went cashless in all their restaurants. You can read about Tender Green's reasoning here:

https://www.tendergreens.com/blog/cashless

 

I accept their reasoning and welcome the change.

 

Tender Greens is a California based restaurant chain. Last month, they opened their first east coast location in NYC, and 2 are opening in Boston soon (Boston locations will accept cash as required by Massachusetts law).

 

 

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Message 21 of 46
Valued Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants


@onstarwrote:

Tender Greens recently went cashless in all their restaurants. You can read about Tender Green's reasoning here:

https://www.tendergreens.com/blog/cashless

 

I accept their reasoning and welcome the change.

 

Tender Greens is a California based restaurant chain. Last month, they opened their first east coast location in NYC, and 2 are opening in Boston soon (Boston locations will accept cash as required by Massachusetts law).

 

 


The only reasoning a merchant needs to go "card/digital wallet" only is, "we're joining the 21st century." I see absolutely no reason to use cash anymore. For one, you need to go out your way to get it from the ATM, or to get the checked cashed for those who don't have direct deposit. Second, it's dirty and infested with germs.  Third, there's no rewards and protections for using cash. 

 

When I see someone pull out cash to pay their $160 grocery bill for the week, or $900 in cash to pay for a new TV, I want to laugh at them for giving up the rewards and protections they could recieve, and for them going out of their way to obtain the cash just so they could pay for something. 

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Message 22 of 46
Established Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants

Well maybe there's a reason they're using cash, catch my drift? Smiley Wink



As of 6/21/18:

Message 23 of 46
Established Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants


@onstarwrote:

Tender Greens recently went cashless in all their restaurants. You can read about Tender Green's reasoning here:

https://www.tendergreens.com/blog/cashless

 

I accept their reasoning and welcome the change.

 

Tender Greens is a California based restaurant chain. Last month, they opened their first east coast location in NYC, and 2 are opening in Boston soon (Boston locations will accept cash as required by Massachusetts law).

 

 


 

 

 I get that they save money on their end by not having to count and deposit that cash... of course, I think that's highly subjective based on the quality of their workers, too.  Seeing that many younger people don't have basic math skills, it doesn't surprise me that inept cashiers don't know how to count change or balance their till and therefor move slowly with a cash transaction. 

 

 Since the proliferation of chip technology in cards, I find it actually takes LONGER for the checkout process to be completed (assuming a competent cashier).  I find it especially annoying at quick serve restuarants that require you to insert your card rather than swipe it.  People with cash go through noticiably faster than those with cards.

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Message 24 of 46
Established Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants

That's because the chip technology implementation in the US is half-assed at best. Chip makes sense if it's a chip+PIN combo for added security, but adding a chip without requiring a PIN seriously baffles me. 

 

I guess I'm used to the longer checkout times since I'm from Canada and we've been chip+PIN since 2010 at least. 



As of 6/21/18:

Message 25 of 46
Valued Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants


@Dalmuswrote:

@onstarwrote:

Tender Greens recently went cashless in all their restaurants. You can read about Tender Green's reasoning here:

https://www.tendergreens.com/blog/cashless

 

I accept their reasoning and welcome the change.

 

Tender Greens is a California based restaurant chain. Last month, they opened their first east coast location in NYC, and 2 are opening in Boston soon (Boston locations will accept cash as required by Massachusetts law).

 

 


 

 

 I get that they save money on their end by not having to count and deposit that cash... of course, I think that's highly subjective based on the quality of their workers, too.  Seeing that many younger people don't have basic math skills, it doesn't surprise me that inept cashiers don't know how to count change or balance their till and therefor move slowly with a cash transaction. 

 

 Since the proliferation of chip technology in cards, I find it actually takes LONGER for the checkout process to be completed (assuming a competent cashier).  I find it especially annoying at quick serve restuarants that require you to insert your card rather than swipe it.  People with cash go through noticiably faster than those with cards.


Quick chip should be implemented at restaurants that are "fast." 

 

The obvious solution to the problem is contactless, but Americans don't understand that concept unlike the rest of the civilized world 

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Message 26 of 46
Established Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants


@arkanewrote:

That's because the chip technology implementation in the US is half-assed at best. Chip makes sense if it's a chip+PIN combo for added security, but adding a chip without requiring a PIN seriously baffles me. 

 

I guess I'm used to the longer checkout times since I'm from Canada and we've been chip+PIN since 2010 at least. 


 Is chip+PIN for credit cards take the same amount of time as a debit card transaction?  If it is, that would add another 2 seconds of irritation for me.  Smiley Happy

 

 Yeah, I know, first world problems...

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Message 27 of 46
Established Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants


@Dalmuswrote:

@arkanewrote:

That's because the chip technology implementation in the US is half-assed at best. Chip makes sense if it's a chip+PIN combo for added security, but adding a chip without requiring a PIN seriously baffles me. 

 

I guess I'm used to the longer checkout times since I'm from Canada and we've been chip+PIN since 2010 at least. 


 Is chip+PIN for credit cards take the same amount of time as a debit card transaction?  If it is, that would add another 2 seconds of irritation for me.  Smiley Happy

 

 Yeah, I know, first world problems...


Good question, sadly the answer is "I don't know" because the number of times I've used my debit card during my college years I can count on both hands LOL. 



As of 6/21/18:

Message 28 of 46
Senior Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants


@mountaindewvoltagewrote:

@onstarwrote:

Tender Greens recently went cashless in all their restaurants. You can read about Tender Green's reasoning here:

https://www.tendergreens.com/blog/cashless

 

I accept their reasoning and welcome the change.

 

Tender Greens is a California based restaurant chain. Last month, they opened their first east coast location in NYC, and 2 are opening in Boston soon (Boston locations will accept cash as required by Massachusetts law).

 

 


The only reasoning a merchant needs to go "card/digital wallet" only is, "we're joining the 21st century." I see absolutely no reason to use cash anymore. For one, you need to go out your way to get it from the ATM, or to get the checked cashed for those who don't have direct deposit. Second, it's dirty and infested with germs.  Third, there's no rewards and protections for using cash. 

 

When I see someone pull out cash to pay their $160 grocery bill for the week, or $900 in cash to pay for a new TV, I want to laugh at them for giving up the rewards and protections they could recieve, and for them going out of their way to obtain the cash just so they could pay for something. 


Please don't take this as a personal attack, but your comments to me at least say everyone needs to see the world through your eyes  - there are a lot of people that don't function within your preferred parameters - older "not hip" people, young "not of age or resource to have a credit card", lower-income people, and people that don't believe in using credit. Many of these "groups" don't have the enlightenment or interest to chase rewards but at the same time most won't eat at these hip-trendy restaurants so I guess that's not really an issue. 

 

My overall concern is not the hipsters' restaurants that choose to discriminate against certain classes of customers based on their "class" as their business plan, but more so the trend where more and more businesses take the Visa Corp bribe to refuse payment options.  

Message 29 of 46
Valued Contributor

Re: The problem with cashless restaurants

People need to see why cashless restaurants should be accepted in our society. 

 

I'm interpreting this as a thread where many see an issue with cashless restaurants, but turn around and praise cash only restaurants. As society itself moves towards liquidated (or digital) cash, mobile wallets to pay their friends, and even mobile wallets to use their "card," I don't see an issue with cashless restaurants. I do feel as if people who try to drill the cash only mindset into others are more guilty of trying to make people adopt to their ways rather than the other way around. Business owners shouldn't expect people to carry cash in what is now considered a predominately digital society. If I'm unfamiliar with an establishment, I (and most others) expect to be able to use their card. 

 

All I'm saying is that I can understand and completely see where 100% cashless restaurants are coming from. Another perks of going cashless? The networks may offer you a significantly lower interchange fee rate. 

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Message 30 of 46