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FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw

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Established Contributor

FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw

Hey guys, so I recently just got a health check up and now have high cholesterol, I'm at 202 - Total Cholesterol, when I should be at under 180. All the others are good, my body mass index is under too. I need to gain weight but anyway I'm trying to spend less money eating out and just buying chicken more in bulk. I'm going to be using foodsaver for the first time and just confused on how to freeze the chicken in bulk. I have 2 jobs, 1 full time where I work from 1pm to sometimes 1130pm to 1AM and it takes me about 30-45 min to get home so to speak. So, its already in the morning. Should I just put the frozen chicken vacuum sealed bags outside in cold water from what I heard when doing research for a couple of hours and then cook?

 

What I want to do is freeze the chicken for a week and then each day, one by one make chicken. How do I go about doing that? Thanks!

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Senior Contributor

Re: FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw

The best method for thawing is to put the frozen meat in the refrigerator the day before you want to use it. I do this all the time. Of course, if you need it faster, put it in cold water and just change the water every few hours
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Re: FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw


@pinkandgrey wrote:
The best method for thawing is to put the frozen meat in the refrigerator the day before you want to use it. I do this all the time. Of course, if you need it faster, put it in cold water and just change the water every few hours

And this may vary depending on:

- How cold your refrigerator is in general

- Where you place the chicken within the fridge (usually the back is coldest, and the doors are warmest)

- The mass of the chicken portion you're thawing

- The surface area (probably less of a concern with smaller portions vs. a whole bird or a big block of parts)

 

Most of the time I need to wait 36-48 hours, but I tend to cook in a larger volume.

 

Soups and stews are also a good chicken option if you decide not to cook every day.

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Re: FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw

I buy in bulk and use the foodsaver (there are two of us).  Along with being a little healthier, it's definitely a lot less expensive.
I just put the frozen chicken in the fridge (in a dish) and defrost overnight/through the day.   But as another poster mentioned, you might have to see how well your fridge works for that.

Another option is to pick a day of the week that's available (for me, it's Sunday) and just do a big batch cooking day and divvy it all out for lunches/dinners over the week.




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Re: FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw


@wasCB14 wrote:

@pinkandgrey wrote:
The best method for thawing is to put the frozen meat in the refrigerator the day before you want to use it. I do this all the time. Of course, if you need it faster, put it in cold water and just change the water every few hours

And this may vary depending on:

- How cold your refrigerator is in general

- Where you place the chicken within the fridge (usually the back is coldest, and the doors are warmest)

- The mass of the chicken portion you're thawing

- The surface area (probably less of a concern with smaller portions vs. a whole bird or a big block of parts)

 

Most of the time I need to wait 36-48 hours, but I tend to cook in a larger volume.

 

Soups and stews are also a good chicken option if you decide not to cook every day.


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Re: FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw

Since I keep kosher, and don't have much of a closer supply here in Sacramento. So I get meat shipped in, or I make a run down to L.A. I store all the meat (also mostly poultry) in a chest freezer in the garage. The Chest freezer is decades old and still running strong. (inhereted from my parents who got it from Motgomery Ward which closed the store here in Sac in the 80's) I usaully thaw qautered chicken 24-36 hours before cooking. Whole turkeys take a bit longer (that I would need to google.) 

 

Good luck lowering your cholesteral.

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Re: FoodSaver - Buying chicken in bulk, freeze then thaw

That's great, on the health goals!  Awesome, keep at it.  

 

I second and third the suggestion for putting the meat in the fridge to defrost during the day.  If it's still a little frozen when you get home, put it in a bowl of room temp water while you prep everything else.  If it's small serving sizes, it'll defrost the rest of the way quickly.  

 

Most important tip - sharp pointy bones will poke right through the plastic under vacuum pressure and ruin the seal.  Buy a box of waxed paper sandwich/food wrap sheets - the kind that pop up like tissues out of a box.  I usually find these at Smart and Final, or any restaurant supply place like Jordano's.  Chicken breast halves are usually chopped through at the ribs, and commercial chicken legs and so forth can be chopped right through the joints, leaving pointy bones.  Some fish fillets will have bones and lobster tails in the shell will have sharp edges too.  Fold the waxed paper in half, and then place over the sharp ends as you're bagging the meat.  If you need more paper, use more.  Don't use regular paper or it will taint the meat - it's important to use food handling paper.  

 

It's often easiest to make a number of smaller bags from the rolls in advance, as your hands will get messy.  You'll get a sense of how big you'll need them to be as you gain experience.   Don't be tempted to skimp on the length too much, as you need enough to clear the clamp as you close it.   I put the bagged meat on a block of wood to raise it a little as I put the end of the bag in the sealer, so it doesn't have to be quite so long.  (Don't worry if this is gibberish now.  It will make sense once you start working with the Foodsaver.). Make sure the part of the bag going in the sealer is dry, and that the meat is as dry as can be.  

 

Keep in mind how much you'll be cooking per meal.  Most often, I'm just cooking for one, so I freeze it in single-batch size.  It's easier to defrost several small packages if you want to cook more, but defrosting a whole lot at once if you aren't planning on cooking it all at once is a pain.  If you aren't doing individually, freeze similar cuts together - legs and thighs together; breast halves together, and wings.  They cook differently, so you may want to use certain parts with certain recipes (i.e., braise or stews for tougher cuts, quick grill or saute for tender cuts.)

 

Also, If you are planning certain easy meals, like stir fry, you can cut all the meat off the bones and slice, then freeze as much as you'd normally  put into one meal separately.  That way, when you come home totally exhausted all the prep work is already done.   

 

If you're doing whole chickens, save the backs, necks, wing tips, any meaty bones etc. for homemade stock and broth.  

 

I raise and butcher my own meat, and often barter for local seafood so I love my Foodsaver.   Chicken, rabbit, goat, and I have not yet raised a pig but I want to!   So that way I not only bring home the bacon, I can raise it, slaughter it, and smoke it too.   *grin*  I've raised pastured poultry commercially before, and sold to local hotels and restaurants.   Best Christmas dinner I made was a home-raised roast goose with port-soaked prune stuffing, port wine reduction sauce, and a pear-and-shallot confit.  Heart  Smiley Wink

 

Be sure to label your packages with a sharpie marker!   Put the type of meat, the cut of meat, and the date on it.  

 

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