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Authorized User Removal

McNugget
Regular Contributor

Authorized User Removal

My husband added me as an authorized user on three of his credit cards way back when we first got married 10 years ago just because we thought that was the way it was supposed to be.

I don't really care to be on them anymore. Is there any way for me to gauge the hit I'll take to my credit score? I have an Excel spreadsheet where I track utilization, AAoA, AoOA, etc etc., but I have never closed any line of revolving credit. Does it stay on my report for a number of years later, or is the entire trade line and it's entire history stripped from report immediately?

Trying to figure out if I should rip the band-aid off quick, or remove them in stages. I am currently rebuilding my credit, so maybe I should just dive right in and get this over with.
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Message 1 of 5
4 REPLIES 4
Revelate
Moderator Emeritus

Re: Authorized User Removal

Is there any specific reason you want to get rid of them?

 

As long as they're useful tradelines (longer than AAOA, clean, minimal or $0 balance) they aren't hurting anything.

 

Anyway AU's come off immediately entire history gone on removal; for impact you could list your before and after AAOA and AOOA over in Understanding Fico Scoring and people would be happy to play guess that score Smiley Happy




        
Message 2 of 5
FIRE-AND-ICE
New Member

Re: Authorized User Removal

Man I want that too but it would be devasting.  I am UA on two cards, my oldest account and the account that has the highest limit.  It would be foolish it just sucks if the other person needs to utilize a lot it affects me Smiley Sad

 

Conversly when they don't spend my score shoots straight up.

 

Guess which scenario is more often and probable to happen again?  (spending more money)

Message 3 of 5
Andypanda
Established Contributor

Re: Authorized User Removal


@Revelate wrote:

Is there any specific reason you want to get rid of them?

 

As long as they're useful tradelines (longer than AAOA, clean, minimal or $0 balance) they aren't hurting anything.

 

Anyway AU's come off immediately entire history gone on removal; for impact you could list your before and after AAOA and AOOA over in Understanding Fico Scoring and people would be happy to play guess that score Smiley Happy


I was an AU on my father’s amex acount. When my father passed, i called amex to close the acount. The acount is still reporting on my ex and tu accounts  but not my eq.

Message 4 of 5
RobertEG
Legendary Contributor

Re: Authorized User Removal

A significant factor in deciding on whether to remove an AU account is what type and amount of new credit do you expect to seek in the future.

AU accounts primarily benefit those in the initial building or rebuilding phase, but can become a detriment when applying for higher and better amounts of credit.

 

By definition, when you have an AU reporting, you gain the numerical benefit in your 3-digit score if the account is solid, but the resulting score is automatically then no longer representative of an evaluation of only your own personal credit risk.

If a prospective creditor does not do a thorough manual review in evaluating an application for credit, they wont be aware that the score they are using is based in part on the credit history of another.  That is often the case in the initial building or rebuilding stages, where the amount of credit being sought is not very high.

 

However, as you move up the credit ladder and apply for higher or better amounts of credit, the liklihood of a manual review of your credit report usually increases.  If a prospective creditor sees one or more AU accounts, they then know that your score is not representative of only your own credit history, and they may discount or disregard the score in their evaluation process.

It is not uncommon, for example, for mortgage lendors to require removal of any AU accounts as part of their underwriting process in order to obtain a "real" credit score that is representative of the consumer's own credit history.

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