cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Is being an Authorized User worth it?

Highlighted

Is being an Authorized User worth it?

I always thought that being an Authorized User was counted in your credit score, and had positive effects on your AAoA. After signing up for myFICO, I see that they don't include this in their scoring. 

 

I'm currently an authorized user on 2 credit card accounts, the older of these has a 90% utilization. I'm trying to figure out if it's worth staying on as an authorized user or not.

Could anyone share their experiences and advice? 

 

Message 1 of 6
5 REPLIES 5
Highlighted
Super Contributor

Re: Is being an Authorized User worth it?

I think a lot of it depends on the creditor and/or the relationship between the AU and the primary.  Different creditors can look at AU's different ways.  If it's an immediate family member (like a father/son with the same name) the chances of the account "counting" for the AU is much greater than if it's some guy that adds his friend in an effort to "help" him.

Message 2 of 6
Highlighted
Super Contributor

Re: Is being an Authorized User worth it?

You don't mention the age of your oldest account (excluding the two AU accounts) and the age of each AU account.  We need that to advise you.

Message 3 of 6
Highlighted
Super Contributor

Re: Is being an Authorized User worth it?

Also your aggregate utilization with and without the AU accounts would be useful as well.

Message 4 of 6
Highlighted
Established Contributor

Re: Is being an Authorized User worth it?

It was worth it for because I t showed positive accounts when I started my rebuild.

Message 5 of 6
Highlighted
Legendary Contributor

Re: Is being an Authorized User worth it?

An AU is, by definition, not an account of the consumer.

It is the account of another that has been reported to your credit file.

Any potential creditor, should they do a manual review, can choose to disregard the effect of an AU in your credit score, as it does not reflect you own actual risk analysis.

However, they have no means to back out the AU and obtain a score that represents only your own risk analysis.

 

It is "worth it" if you are rebuilding,and seeking credit for which the creditor does not do a manual review that could make them aware of the presence of an AU in your scoring.

However, as you move up the credit chain and apply for higher levels of credit, a manual review becomes more likely, as does the chance that the presence of an AU could lead to concerns by the creditor.

Message 6 of 6
Advertiser Disclosure: The offers that appear on this site are from third party advertisers from whom FICO receives compensation.