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Frequent Address Change

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Frequent Address Change

I am moving across country and buying a home.  I will be living in a hotel near work for about a month waiting on my home to close.

 

Since I won't be able to receive mail, I was wondering if this would be looked down on?

 

I am moving from the Pacific NW to Wisconsin.  

 

I will have all my creditors send mail to my parents' home in Texas, then when I move into my home in Wisconsin I will update the address.

 

So it would look like I moved twice in a span of about a month and a half to two different states.  

 

Would that cause AA?

 

I already looked up a PO Box but some of my creditors will not accept a PO Box.

 

thanks

5 REPLIES 5
Established Contributor

Re: Frequent Address Change


@Rachel9 wrote:

I am moving across country and buying a home.  I will be living in a hotel near work for about a month waiting on my home to close.

Since I won't be able to receive mail, I was wondering if this would be looked down on?

I am moving from the Pacific NW to Wisconsin.  

I will have all my creditors send mail to my parents' home in Texas, then when I move into my home in Wisconsin I will update the address.

So it would look like I moved twice in a span of about a month and a half to two different states.  

Would that cause AA?

I already looked up a PO Box but some of my creditors will not accept a PO Box.


No, changing address twice should not cause any AA.

 

I get all my financial mail delivered to a P.O. Box, so that should be available to you as well.

 

I think where you are getting confused is with the address accepted when you applied for a NEW credit account.  After 9/11, the USA Patriot Act required lenders to verify applicant's identity carefully.  Some are more diligent than others.  I have had lenders deny an application where I tried to use my P.O. Box number.  I found I sometimes needed to apply with my Street Address, then later update the address online to my P.O. Box once the card was approved.  I like having a PO Box long-term because my mail is much more secure  with all the curbside box mail theft and identity theft these days.  I've never had any lender or bank refuse to send my mail to a PO Box.   Just go to your account management page online and it should allow you to change it.  Some lenders keep your street address on file but allow you indicate a preferred mailing address in addition, where you can put the P.O. Box address.

 

I would recommend the P.O. Box since it would be just one change and probably a little more convenient for you.




Total Length of Credit = 35+ years; AoOA (Currently open accounts) = 26+ years;
AAoA = 9.5+ years; AoYA = less than 1 year (Aug 2019)
Total Open Credit Lines Over $400K. Utilization Less Than 1%. Inquiries until May 2020 (TU:1 -- EQ:0 -- EX:5)
*Hover cursor over each card to see name, CL
Message 2 of 6
Valued Contributor

Re: Frequent Address Change

While I've never been in that exact predicament, it shouldn't cause a problem as long as the bills are getting paid. Life happens.

If it was a real problem how would Active Military deal with this issue? Who can move around quite frequently.

 

Generally new address are only a concern for new employers, or major credit purchas such as car. Thay want to see stabilty. 

 

If I were in your situation I would switch to email statements to lessen the burden of physical mail. Heck I figured most people today already did this anyways.






Message 3 of 6
Valued Contributor

Re: Frequent Address Change

^ +1


I also recommend a PO Box.  Yes, they need a physical address for new credit, but using a PO Box for a mailing address shouldn't be a problem.  It's definitely easier than having to switch your accounts repeatedly, and as an added bonus you have a bit of extra security not giving anyone your home address for other business if you so choose.

Oct 2019


Garden goal: keep on keepin' on
Usually a faithful practitioner of AZE5or6or7; working on AZE1or2 and grumbling about it.
Message 4 of 6
Established Contributor

Re: Frequent Address Change


@Janus wrote:

If I were in your situation I would switch to email statements to lessen the burden of physical mail. Heck I figured most people today already did this anyways.


Well, here's another perspective.  I partially use electronic documents and find them somewhat convenient.  If I'm on a website and want to see something about my bill, I may open up the current or a prior month's statement. 

 

Some people may even prefer the 'convenience' of exclusively-electronic statements.  But many of us who are used to paper statements much prefer them overall.  So I see e-statements as increasing my burden, not decreasing it.  It's not really about saving the environment as they try to promote.  It's about decreasing their costs of printing and mailing statements.  But of course, they don't pass these savings along to the consumer.

 

Lenders don't keep these statements available indefinitely.  If I want a permanent record, I would have to remember to (as a minimum) individually download all my statements to my computer every month (and I have a lot).  And since I know electronically-stored documents are only as good as the magnetic stability and the currently-available storage media, as well as the ability of software to read the files, I believe paper is the most stable longer-term solution.   If I want paper, then I have to take the additional step to not only download but also print the statements at my expense of paper and ink. I've saved files I could not easily open later on computers (software) and I've saved files in storage media that is now obsolete such as floppy disks.

 

And if I become seriously ill or when I pass away, paper statements in the mail will be much easier for my family and/or heirs to sort through than trying to get into my email or find website logins where I have done business.   I had to deal with my parent's estate and I'm glad THEY didn't have everything set up electronically.  Paper is just easier to manage over the long term to me.  E-documents are okay in the moment but they may or not be there when you need them.

 

So no, exclusively e-statements are not what I want and I get very annoyed by everyone pushing us in that direction.  (Most of my financial institutions send me "reminders" to go paperless.)  Seriously?  Like you think I don't know what I'm doing  .... Smiley Sad




Total Length of Credit = 35+ years; AoOA (Currently open accounts) = 26+ years;
AAoA = 9.5+ years; AoYA = less than 1 year (Aug 2019)
Total Open Credit Lines Over $400K. Utilization Less Than 1%. Inquiries until May 2020 (TU:1 -- EQ:0 -- EX:5)
*Hover cursor over each card to see name, CL
Message 5 of 6
Valued Contributor

Re: Frequent Address Change

I know how you feel, I resisted e-statemtns for a lot of years of constant nagging. And honestly I'm in that divided camp. One day though after "realizing" how any boxes of old statements I had, I decided to switch a few to electronic. In my case I found it easier and quicker to simply log on to my CC acount and click on the statement I'm after, as opposed to digging through boxes of statements trying to find the right one. Plus for the ones with big/important purchases I started to save a copy to my PC for quick reference. 

And yes i have had that issue of not being able to open an old file on a new PC. lol

 

So i don't know that there really is a great choice, paper only lasts a very long time if stored and cared for properly. And can be lost very easily in a fire or flood, as I have had experience with. 

 

Oh, and I agree it's not about the environment. The Company I work for spouts that for everything we do, yet they constantly create unneeded waste that negates anything we try to reduce. 






Message 6 of 6
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